Tag Archives: digital art

Video, Still

capture_006_18112014_190638

In delicious, meta-telescope fashion, I’ve been taking screen caps of my video art.

The videos themselves are already either composed of sequenced screen caps, or of sampled and heavily modified clips that in turn generated other sets of screen caps (and subsequent digital images). I’m excited about the results:

Digital Autumn

92314_4

Though I’ve mostly been focusing on video work, research, painting and writing, I’m still plugging away at the digital montages, developing new stills all the time as standalone pieces, and as fodder for future paintings.

I’m still using the digital imaging as a field of intense investigation, allowing time ruptures and even micro-narratives to rupture the painterly surface.

The batch of stills I produced in October and November were red and blue heavy, and I leaned away from my typical infusion of orange-pink-yellow to provide some visual variety, without losing the scheme of the digital desert.

reed3

92314_2

92314_9

Some of them even pulled rather dark, and I allowed them to push the outer edge of my palette to see where the language was headed:

92214

See a selection of additional digital stills in the gallery

I’ve also quite enjoyed catching stills from my own videos, which themselves are composed of twice-removed captures:

capture_027_07112014_220455 wc2

Major Decisions: The Narrow Way

scaffolding2

Besides being the semester mid-point, my 3rd-semester mid-term coincided with major changes in the final direction of my thesis project, The Cascade – Moments in the Televisual Desert. I plotted several distinct pieces that need to be completed before January and determined the final format and physical considerations of the last part of the triad: the interactive.

So, in addition to continued conceptual investigation, I grappled with medium, technique and materials in a direct way–clearing the “limitless possibilities” that were effectively making part of the project freeze, Hamlet-style, from too many options.

The three-part, interdisciplinary installation will include painting and video, which were already decided, but the possible format of the video, plus the final direction of the third element–the interactive R/W component, were still up in the air.

The interactive component had so many potentialities it became limiting instead of liberating.  I had built and cross-referenced output format lists, based on suggestions and investigations, which implied the third component could take nearly any form–from interactive fiction to downloadable apps–digital images on paper to responsive environments. I had also started down all of those avenues, experimenting without critically tying each output back to my concept.

I did some conceptual housekeeping, sweeping away techniques that did not directly communicate my concept and its ties to televisual experience (output formats like websites, phone apps and Processing referenced digitality flavored by the Internet, speaking less about the nature of television and more about the broader computerized spectrum of 21st century communication). Instead I zeroed in on a form of stereoscopy for the third component, which ties in to memory theory and physical interactivity, while referencing televisual memory on several levels. I’ll do a big reveal later in the semester, but it feels good to weed the garden of endless mediums! The interactive has become stereoscopic. If the stereoscopy does not hold up to more rigorous critique, there are several other formats that can be revisited.

Above: Completed Encounter video.

The video display has been narrowed down from a wild list of on-site projections, digital photo frames, and room-filling environmental shifts to a single monitor or system of multiple monitors which play the videos with out-loud audio on the main display. During the last residency I found viewers were split 50/50 on reception of the videos on a large scale or more intimate size. The larger scale referenced the black box of cinema and filmic language. The smaller scale referenced television. While it would be interesting to construct an enter-able televisual space, with multiple projections in a darkened room, I found that referencing television via the televisual screen makes the most sense, especially the more I’ve dug in to the differences between television theory and cinematic theory. The black box of cinema expects the viewer to sit down and focus on the language of film, much like the novel, which restrains, constrains and uses its own cultivated language–characters and locations are fully rendered in a lengthier window of time than your average television episode, yet it has a much shorter expanse in which to develop virtual relationships than a 24-episode tv season. It’s more complex than this, but in a nutshell, cinema is over-arching, encompassing. Television is episodic, fleeting, but builds a dynamic mosaic for interpretation. We engage with tv on different days, in different moods–but film is meant to be consumed in one shot, one specific length.

Television is a “white box” medium which co-exists in our personal, social and lived-in spaces. We don’t turn the lights down (unless we’re watching a filmic experience on television) to engage with it. Instead, TV occupies a light, lively room. We may pass in front of the box, doing chores, talking, temporarily engaging the screen, getting wrapped up in bursts of sound, snippets of dialogue… it is a medium of oral tradition, of mosaic image-memory, of fragmentary, flowing storytelling. It occupies more hours with us in our physical geographies, in our relationship to friends and family in location-situated space.

Showing the videos on a television-referent monitor as wormholes into time, space, memory, landscape, histopry and television makes sense. Even those who prefer to view television via Netflix or Hulu on computers or mobile devices engage with the media intimately, yet with an odd sense of passive control, small and close. In the white box of the gallery space, it makes sense. With lights on, the rest of the installation lit and occupying pass-through space… it makes sense!

My decision was influenced by discussions with fellow students, faculty, advisors, my mentors–and by viewing a variety of video art projections and installations in person, gauging my response to the physical display, as well as the response of other visitors.

I’d still like to experiment with an all-tv room, or with projections on scrims, but in my gut I know tv will show tv.

92314_4

I’ve also narrowed the way further. The sheer amount of material that was filmed in Los Angeles County between 1965 and1989 is staggering. I had initially limited the pool of resources to television, rather than the thousands of hours of cinematic references to the same geographic considerations, because I knew it would be overwhelming.  I also knew the inclusion of film would change the dynamic (and personality) of the language I would be investigating and the forms the project could take. Thus, I had to leave Soledad Canyon gems like Duel (1971) off the table.

These early decisions remain in place. However, the pool of available television is itself a massive, decade-spanning archive. I fielded hours of television time, watching, hunting, scouring, sampling, barely melting that formidable iceberg tip. As I mentioned in an earlier post, my reasons for choosing certain programs are systematic and (hopefully) logical. Even with the guidelines I set for myself, the archive was still too big and expanding too quickly (nearly everyone at the last two residencies has suggested additional programming, additional genres), so I drew the line. I’m not adding any more programs, as tempting as it is (and even as I constantly remember more episodes and programs filmed in these locations!).

I’m finding the ground much more fertile when my ever-expansive view returns home, focused and narrowed on the final stretch.

My crystallized, official schema:

Program Selection

1.) They had to be filmed in Los Angeles County during the 1960s, 1970s or 1980s (the heyday of LA County as the seat of American television filming).

2.) They had to be programs I had originally watched in their first (or partial first) run, or in syndication during those same decades (in-context viewing).

3.) They had to offer some kind of iconographic contribution to the project; the “paramedics” or the “detectives.”

4.) They had to be dramas (I excised sitcoms, cowboy serials and other programs early on, as the language is quite different–though I can see returning to investigate these genres in the future).

5.) They had to be programs I had actually enjoyed watching, or felt some obsessive compulsion to engage with. This is why, for example, Airwolf isn’t on the list. I frankly didn’t like it. This is important for the earnest angle, which leaves sarcastic critique at the door.

6.) I had to be a distilled, representative array, including highly recognizable works paired with obscure memory-traces (a la Douglas Gordon, Renee Green).

For the second half of the semester, I’m planning to complete the rest of the video set, which magnifies various tropes and locations, including Ambush, Airplane (Rental), Car Chase, Auto Accident, Secret Air Base, Sniper, Desert Fire, and Military Action – (titles not final). I’ll be working my way through these with my palette of clips and ideas, though some may carry over to next semester. Plus, I’m working on new digital stills (see the two this post) and I intend to finish the next 2-3 paintings in the series.

And, here’s Pink Floyd’s – The Narrow Way. For the hell of it. http://youtu.be/TJaj_2xsHzc

Remix and the Celestial Jukebox – The Contemporary Artist as Cultural DJ

elevator6Research Paper 1
Peter Rostovsky – Advisor
Fall, 2014

Remix and the Celestial Jukebox – The Contemporary Artist as Cultural DJ

EXCERPT – These are only the first two paragraphs, plus related footnotes!
To read the entire paper, please download or open the complete PDF File: RP 1 2.0_Web

We live in the age of remix. Not just an appropriative phase, but an era of remix as cultural mediation—where recombination is a fundamental approach to cultural exchange (Manovich 1). Remix is the language of the Information Age[1], the coinage of Post-Postmodernism[2], rooted in long-developing systems of commercialism and communication. The very fiber of our social connectivity rests in an endless rewrite of materials, mashups,[3] pastiche and database sensibilities, intrinsically tied to everything from Google searches to language, television, art and text.

Remix is a manipulation and integration of cultural space, wherein the author-reader generates (and regenerates) moments in a self-curated, postproduction world. The resulting experiential theater is populated by fragments drawn from diverse sources, spinning elements with a cross-cultural, archival impulse that is both eclipsing and fragmentary.[4] Remix in contemporary art is the ‘appropriation’[5] of the 21st century, no longer the re-photography of Richard Prince, but a mutable landscape that uses a vast media-archive of memory and material: referred to here as the Celestial Jukebox.[6] It is a manifestation of the filter bubble’s[7] “parallel but separate universes” and the ghost-in-the-machine of convergence culture (Pariser 5).[8] Remix is bigger than the art world, bigger than commerciality—an invisible, increasingly normalized framework that provides strategies for communication and interaction. Conscious use of remix allows contemporary artists like Jennifer & Kevin McCoy and Anthony Discenza to build an interrogative, self-reflective investigation of the Information Age itself. The artist becomes a cultural DJ, a manipulator of archival compulsions that leads to “a kind of hunter-gatherer milieu…” (Miller). Such artists draw from the Celestial Jukebox, remixing, mashing and re-contextualizing material—providing a “systematic reworking of a source,” grounding individual perspective in a de-centering of authorship (Manovich 3).  Investigating contemporary recombination also critically anchors my own body of video work, where remix and manipulation open dialogue about the nature of televisual space-time, recollection and iconographic culture.


To read the entire paper, please download or open the complete article as a PDF File: RP 1 2.0_Web

Footnotes

[1] Recognized as the period in human technological history following the Space Age and associated with the Digital Revolution.

[2] The period immediately following Postmodernism. Theorist Alan Kirby considers Post-Postmodernism, or Digimodernism, a paradigm shift that ruptures existing cultural relationships: “Digimodernism identifies as the critical event in contemporary culture the profound and shattering encounter between computerization and the text. Its most recognizable form is a new kind of digitized textuality—onward, haphazard and evanescent—that disrupts traditional ideas about authorship and reading…” (“Successor States…” Kirby). I would argue that it erodes the broader concept of ‘text’ itself, re-orienting the idea of the original.

[3] Common in music, a ‘mashup’ is a combination of elements, often overlaid, which results in a new composition that may retain recognizable elements of the sampled material. To cite a form of remix culture at its most ubiquitous, today’s ‘mashup’ page on Wikipedia defines the process as: “a song or composition created by blending two or more pre-recorded songs, usually by overlaying the vocal track of one song seamlessly over the instrumental track of another. To the extent that such works are “transformative” of original content, they may find protection from copyright claims under the “fair use” doctrine of copyright law.” The term ‘remix’ and ‘mashup’ are sometimes used interchangeably, though ‘remix’ offers are more complex description of the variability of appropriation, recombination and transmutation of elements than ‘mashup.’ ‘Mashups’ can also refer to hybrid, overlaid apps and programs (Manovich 1).

[4] DJ Spooky suggests that “our semantic web is a remix of all available information… the result is an immense repository—an archive of almost anything that has ever been recorded” (Miller).

[5] ‘Appropriation’ is the preferred art world descriptor, in place of  ‘remix,’ ‘mashup’ and ‘rewrite’—bound in part to cultural notions of ‘remix’ as copyright violation. ‘Appropriation’ grants a sense of acceptability. Theorist Lev Manovich believes “…‘remixing’ is a better term [than appropriation] because it suggests a systematic re-working of a source, the meaning which ‘appropriation’ does not have” (“What Comes After…” Manovich 4). When we remix, we rework previously existing cultural works (“What Comes After…” Manovich 2).

[6] “Celestial Jukebox” stems from a 1995 US Government white paper concerning media flow and consumer access. The paper “invoked the image of a technology-packed satellite orbiting thousands of miles above earth, awaiting a subscriber’s order—like a nickel in the old jukebox, and the punch of a button to connect him to a vast storehouse of entertainment and information through a home or office receiver combining the powers of a television, radio, CD and DVD player, telephone, fax, and personal computer” (Goldstein 187). Since then, theorists like Paul Goldstein and Lawrence Lessig have broadened this idea, adapting it to suit its obvious relationship to data pooling (Wasow). It describes not only services like Netflix or Hulu, but also the Internet, and the ‘Cloud.’ It encompasses an entire database—a universe—of information, images, sounds, video, experiences… it describes the Information Age itself, not an idealistic subscription-based service. It is Manovich’s cultural database (“What Comes After…” 5).

[7] Social theorist Eli Pariser refers to the “unique universe of information for each of us” (9), which are “parallel but separate” (5) as we navigate and extrapolate information and experience from the filtered digital experience. Search engines and websites use algorithms that constantly filter and adjust what we see, denying the idea of a free, democratic web, while simultaneously allowing us to completely privatize and customize our knowledge base.

[8]   ‘Convergence Culture’ is a concept developed by Henry Jenkins which describes a fundamental, information-age paradigm shift (243): “Convergence represents a cultural shift as consumers are encouraged to seek out new information and make connections among dispersed media content… spectators perform in the new media system” (Jenkins 3). It also recognizes a new kind of participatory culture, the fractured nature of parallel but separate realities and data streams (not unlike theorist Fredric Jameson’s recognition of language privatization) and the ability of culture recipients to “construct [their] own personal mythologies” from a stream of information (Jenkins 3). Convergence culture relates to an integration of media, data formats, art and styles—“convergence thinking is like interdisciplinary thinking” (Jenkins 12).

August Update

IMG_1304

The sun is rapidly setting on August and the light in New Mexico has shifted. Time to take inventory of my late-summer work.

I’ve been reading heaps of television and new media theory, continuing investigation into remix culture, appropriation, cultural structure and  theories of memory while also honing my video production skills. It seems I’ve been reading more this semester than any previous, which is saying something, as I’m always a prolific reader. My first research paper for the semester is centered on remix and the role of artist as cultural DJ (will share it soon).

I’ve also been developing a more final, conceptual outline of why my thesis contains three distinct elements that alternately access a related core. It’s connected to notions of television experience as a virtual mosaic, to Minkowski’s graph of space-time and to Lev Manovich’s three-screen theory. Too much to go into in this update, but it’s rapidly taking shape.

elevator8

Still from “Elevator (Finding a Way out of Here, I Hope)”

My studio work has been centered on developing videos, including massive back-end sampling, altering, generating and “painting” with moving media. So I Asked… and Elevator (Finding a Way Out of Here, I Hope) were developed during July and completed in August.

Many hours go into the scouting, capping and video remix process. Over the course of July and August I completed an obscene amount of tele-viewing time, scouring all 122 episodes of The Rockford Files, re-watching 78 episodes of Adam-12, 129 episodes of Emergency!, 7 episodes of Columbo, 4 episodes of Knight Rider, 22 episodes of The Greatest American Hero and 59 episodes of Simon & Simon. I say “obscene” simply because of the dismissive attitude television-viewing tends to invite. That’s a lot of TV (not even counting the episodes that were repeatedly scoured, broken down and disassembled).

Sound crazy? Research is always a little borderline, anyway. At least borderline obsessive for me. The television deluge served to reveal a bigger image of televisual structure, the function of television as mosaic (and as an extension of oral tradition) and as compositional flow. After a while, you see segments as painted moments in a longer, cyclical turn. This is very useful to the way I’m working with the painting and video.

Still from "So I Asked..."

Still from “So I Asked…”

The videos include layers of manipulated stills, altered footage, digital painting and sound that’s been sampled, mixed, remixed and composed using Audacity. I combined remixed television sound footage with my own sampled audio taken with a Zoom Microtrack recorder.

I’ve also generated hundreds of new screen caps and I’ve just started work on the second 38″ x 50″ painting.

I also experimented with contrasting present-day Google Street Views with show clips and discovered they lead in the wrong visual-physical direction for my 2015 thesis project, but are still fascinating on an urban archaeological level. During my research, I also found devoted fan bases, like the folks at the Official Dwight Schultz Fansite (A-Team Filming Locations), who do footwork to combine video stills with Google Street Views (and actual street shots the fans carve out on their own time), not unlike my experiments earlier this semester. However, their work is a collaborative effort, making use of crowd-sourced skills and knowledge–a compelling turn, and a confirmation that the iceberg revealed by my contrast experiment is meant for another project.

The overall concept behind the fansite research, however, is highly relevant to my thesis– a reminder that fictionalized, pop cultural narratives happened in real space. And here, the landscape becomes a site of activation, a catalyst for decade-spanning personal, regional and cultural interactions. Fans work with space-place memories, track down the actual locations, build new associations with the urban-archaeological discovery (and again, new memories and experiences), then share them as part of a collaborative digital space.

elevator7

Still from “Elevator…”

My mentor is also finalized–with thanks to Peter Rostovsky. I’ll be working with Kevin McCoy this Fall (of the collaborative duo, Jennifer & Kevin McCoy).

And here is a preview of the new painting, in its early-early phase.

IMG_3605---Copy

So I Asked… (Elevator)

Videos include sound (lots of subtle layers, too, so turn up the volume if you can!)

So I asked…

Elevator (Finding a Way Out of Here, I Hope)
– Combines “stop animation” style stills with moving action.

elevator6

Please note–Elevator is not functioning inline, so please visit my website to view the video. 

Peter Rostovsky suggested I consider new ways of dimensionalizing the television experience (which I applied to consideration of the dimensional nature of real and constructed space; in this case, the California landscape as mediated by now-historical television).

I collapsed, condensed, mutated, fabricated and re-contextualized images that were formerly stills. Suddenly things were moving, deepening and expanding my dimensional palette. Elements were disintegrating, breathing, dancing–full of renewed agency. My landscapes were alive–and they weren’t just looping!

I treat the video work the way I handle the creation of digital images (and painting). I develop and respond, investigate and rebound.

During this process of bound and re-bound, certain characters entered the elastic-space as freshly refined icons. I was intrigued by their presence and obsessively pursued their emerging “selfhood.” It made me think of how, in the beginning, I only wanted the bare landscape in my digital desert. I had originally dumped precision details, but vehicles, individuals and even interior spaces crept into the mix. As Tony Apesos pointed out, I’m repopulating the gradually-emptied landscape phenomena, which has been losing specific objects and people since the 16th century. It’s curious, potentially frightening (and exhilarating).

The inclusion of people as part of the video cadence also flirted with narrative, which, as many of you know, has always been intentionally elusive or denied. Here I emphasized the almost-narrative by allowing moments to rhythmically rebound, but keeping with my larger concepts, the resolution of story is always denied.

I’ve been reading a ton of television theory and I’ve discovered fascinating ways of digging into the idea of mosaic and montage, implied space and the passage of time. Each video is intentionally meta-referential. Certain clips, moments and colors are allowed to cycle, forming choruses that seem familiar, yet always shift. Just past the bridge (thinking in musical terms here), a set of layered clips are allowed to temporarily emerge, only to fall away without returning.

The sound is a carefully composed layered blend of recordings I did on a Zoom Microtrack, combined with television audio and ambient noise.

I feel like an alchemical-archaeologist.

Digital Latin America, 2014 Exhibition

IMG_3503

Jessica Angel, Hemispheric Immersion, 2014.

This week I viewed the Digital Latin America Exhibition at 516 Arts in Albuquerque, one of the city’s only true contemporary art spaces. The carefully curated show was brimming with compelling, 21st century investigations of space, identity, perception, language and the line between digital and physical.

The exhibition also proved fruitful (and invigorating!) for my own digital/hybrid work and I was able to enjoy each of the installations as new media objects, while also considering conceptual applications to my thesis. Several of the pieces encouraged me to reconsider how I can engage with the viewer, electronic media and physical space. I went away scribbling tons of notes!

From 516:

Digital Latin America is an outgrowth of the Latin American Forum for the award-winning International Symposium of Electronic Arts (ISEA2012) produced by 516 ARTS last fall (www.isea2012.org).  It will explore the North/South axis of cultural development and exchange between South America, Central America and the Southwest United States.

Connecting individuals, cultures, traditions and social histories to a rapidly expanding global network remains not only a pressing challenge but a profound opportunity and necessity.  The utopian notion of closing the digital divide represents a paradigm shift that encourages the participation of all communities and cultures to express themselves through contemporary methods and continue a progressive existence in today’s technology dependent society.  Digital Latin America looks at the ways in which artists negotiate the complex terrain between global and local, virtual and real, and political and private, in the creation of work that proposes alternative understandings of technology, art and cultural exchange.
The multi-site International Art Exhibition, based at 516 ARTS’ museum-style venue in the center of Downtown Albuquerque, will highlight contemporary artists from Latin America and the Southwestern United States with high caliber, innovative, interactive artworks, accessible to the general public and presented in an educational context.  Satellite artworks and exhibitions will be located at The Albuquerque Museum of Art & History and UNM Art Museum.

 

The viewer is dwarfed, consumed even, by Jessica Angel’s Hemispherical Immersion, 2014. Constructed of offset prints, adhesive vinyl and physical perversions of perspective, this massive piece fills the entrance, rising several several floor. It was delightfully challenging to truly comprehend the scale and distortion–a process my iPhone camera failed to resolve.

IMG_3504

The work demands the viewer to consider their physical and visual position in constructed, deep “digital” space, blurring the definition between the architectural environment and the artist’s mark.

IMG_3505

The viewer literally walks in, on and through Angel’s piece. Angel literally asks us, “Can we fantasize that we are as teeny as a living megabyte, sightseeing through the superhighways of information?”

There is no way to access any other part of the exhibition without negotiated the semi-real space of Angel’s information-scape.

 

IMG_3506

Another artist (whose name I shamefully did not note) produced a work that invites touch. A wired system of braille is framed and lit. Viewers interact with it by looking, touching and listening. As you run your fingers across the braille, it triggers atmospheric, ambient sounds. Not knowing how to read braille myself, the raised bumps suddenly elicited a new kind of meaning and understanding.

I’ll post the artist’s name after I make a return visit to the gallery.  IMG_3509

Rejane Cantone and Leonardo Crescenti produced Speak / Fala, 2011. This hybrid work makes use of voice-responsive software and interacts with the viewer, or with itself if no words are spoken into the microphone. It cycles through a variety of languages, preventing it from being lodged in one linguistic tradition or association. It also means the viewer can speak almost any language into the mic and receive integrative responses. When I said “hello,” I was greeted by a gradual chorus of international “welcomes.” When I said, “tomorrow,” the speakers fell silent briefly, then one said, “to-morrow” and another said “24 hours” before diving into variations of days, passages and time.

IMG_3511

New Mexico Diné artist William R. Wilson sucked us into Talking Tintypes, 2014. Several richly textured, digital enlargements of hand-processed tintype photographs created a corner of pause–the subjects in each panel equally paused in mid-action, quietly considering the viewer. We took the time to read the panel and discovered the photos were actually embedded with QR codes and could be scanned.

You can see the photos above and below as an example of the way the work shatters the separation between digital and physical, shifting our understanding of the “still” in a provocative way.

Pointing a smartphone to “read” the portraits instantly opened an active video of the same tintype. The portrait literally comes to life and the subject completes a process (reading a poem, dancing, playing an instrument) as a virtual extension of the frozen still. This recalls, for me at least, the 19th century work of problematic photographers like Edward R. Curtis, who frequently presented the “vanishing Indian” as a colonized archetype of the tame-able wild, often posing them in a hodge podge of cultural items and dresses drawn from nations outside their own. The Native American of Curtis (and photographers like him) became a generic, iconographic non-person. Here, a Native artist provides access to portraits of human beings as active, engaged, creative individuals that spring to life through a digital-physical crossover. Each individual demonstrates the kind of agency denied to most of the 19th century subjects.

IMG_3514

 

IMG_3512

Above: Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Surface Tension, 1992. Plasma screen, computerized surveillance system, custom-made software. Hemmer’s eye is closed when you’re out of range, but opens and watches you impassively as you move about the gallery, especially as you speak with the smartphones in the work mentioned earlier. As you talk into the mic, engaged with another work of art, the eye considers your actions ambivalently and unabashedly.

Below: Giselle Bieguelman’s Cinema Lascado (Chipped Movies), 2010 and 2013, was incredibly compelling. Projected into a separated space (just out of eye-shot of Hemmer’s piece), the viewer is confronted by disturbing, fractured sequences–stills that are animated by the force of their forward momentum. Ambient, sometimes grating, noise fills the room, swelling and dissipating as you occasionally uncover strains of action (is explosion a natural part of the harbor function, or an attack? A destructive moment?) but it denies resolution. Instead, it brings montage and filmic compositing together. Fractured moments provide a mosaic-like overview of an urban industrial space, where you understand change takes place, sometimes drawn out as archaeological moments, other times in the blink (or melting) of a still.

IMG_3515  IMG_3528

Hernando Barragán, Interactive Lamps,

 

 

Above: Hernando Barragán, Interactive Lamps.

IMG_3539

 

There were many other pieces in the exhibition and it’s worth ordering a copy of the exhibition catalog if you’re interested in the cross-platform, cross-cultural investigations of these artists. You can also view additional images of other works, and read more about some of the artists I did not mention here, by viewing the links below:

Related links:

http://www.santafenewmexican.com/pasatiempo/art/art_reviews/art-in-review-digital-latin-america-at-arts/article_b057ba10-490b-5cdb-9d11-37f351ab00e0.html

http://516arts.org/images/stories/PDFs/2014/Review__516_Arts.pdf

http://adobeairstream.com/art/albuquerques-digital-latin-america-etches-parallel-visions/

 

 

Investigations in Video

I’ve been spending the last couple of weeks doing intense research and sourcing materials, output formats and software for the studio work. I’ve also done a lot of screen captures and video clipping, prepping a new arsenal of raw material for the semester.

Some of what I’ve been working with are moving edits and clips, recontextualized via splicing, editing, formatting and blending. This is a rough idea of the tip of the iceberg:

I can’t wait to see where (and how) it transforms!

I’m also experimenting with time, color and surface quality in the clips:

Expect a TON of new iterations and excavations as I really dig in to the mutli-part components to this project. I’m treating the rough, raw video as painterly expressions…

Projections

IMG_2926

 

The past few days I’ve been testing projections in my studio, using my trusty new Pico pocket projector. These video manipulations constantly shift, sometimes subtly, transforming the physical environment with a rhythmic, circular sense of geography and altered space.

The on-board video processor does not allow the videos to loop seamlessly, as they were built (and intended), so I’m in the process of rounding up connectivity equipment for pulling the videos from a proper source, rather than just a USB drive with the Pico’s own processor. I anticipating having seamless versions enabled for the residency and I’ll be using a special app designed for art installations to manage the video.

I am so excited!

IMG_2922 IMG_2925 IMG_2927 IMG_2933 IMG_2935

 

The pocket projector is limited in the size it can cast. I was able to get it up to about 70″, so for a more final version cast into the thesis exhibition space, I’ll need a beefier projector system–but overall I am very pleased with my well-researched Aaxa LED Pico Pocket Projector. So much bang for the buck!

Here’s a short clip from one of the video projections, in situ:

 

 

June Horizons

IMG_2902

Earlier in the semester I wanted to output some of the Horizons at about 100″ in length–but I’ve since reconsidered this for the upcoming residency. Instead, I’m outputting them at about 30″ in length, to gauge response (and conceptual delivery).

Seeing several versions of the Horizons set cast as video projection (over 100″) was actually more intriguing than the static versions on paper. I hope this will be a fruitful talking point at the residency, actually, as the larger Horizons may function better as proper, light-based, environmental moments.

In the meantime, though, I finally sourced a decent local printer for the 30″ experiments. Just in time, too. It’s been a pain to balance quality, color-correctness and price. I need a supplies grant! LOL.
IMG_2903